10 Responses

  1. lisa44837
    lisa44837 at |

    Since up until recently, I was having to pinch every penny (and I still have to watch to a degree because until just this past week, my parents & I were paying my son’s expenses for the last year due to both a glitch in the system & user error with his FAFSA) I’ve been both conscious of page/word count & price for most books. I watch to get most of my reading material when it’s marked down which makes me feel bad for the authors because I want them to prosper, however reading is my main source of recreation. The less I spend on each book, the more I can buy. I also enter a lot of contests & have won quite a few. So if I win books from a new-to-me author & like their work, I look for more of it. If I really like something, I’m more willing to spend more. I also use my library as much as possible. When I find an author/narrator combo I really like, I get as many as possible from Audible (or borrow from my library). I hoard my credits as much as possible so if there’s a series I want to binge listen to, I can do that without running out of credits & without running up my credit card balance any more than I have to. I watch for ARE’s 50% rebate sales & pad my bonus bucks balance so when I’m purchasing books from their site, it’s money already spent + 50% bonus added. I try to keep a paypal balance so that purchases from Kobo, DSP, or other vendors using paypal is not coming directly from my disposable income – same at Amazon, I keep a GC balance.

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    1. Vicktor "Vic" Alexander
      Vicktor "Vic" Alexander at |

      That’s actually a really good idea to let things build up that way. I’ve done a bit of that… or I did before the great iPad Death of 2016, but I think that what you do is what a lot of other readers do as well.

      Reply
  2. chakirahotmailcouk
    chakirahotmailcouk at |

    I don’t either write or read short books. 10k words, to me, is a short story which I shy away from writing because I just can’t get my stories out, sometimes even in six or seven times that amount. The same thing goes for the books I read. Short books don’t attract my attention because the writing tends to be very tight, story development fast (or absent) and character development non existent. I like my stories to unfold not just be there, if you know what I mean. That’s not to say there are not some very good 10k or 20k books, they’re just not for me. Therefore, I can’t really say that I’ve paid much attention to the way they are priced. I tend to look for bargains and sales, like I do when I’m shopping in the real world and snap up as many books as I can when they’re on offer. I also have a very good friend who somehow seems to know when authors are doing free offers and I snap them up. Mind you, that often leads me to buying other books in the series (which I suppose is the point of offering the first book free) so it doesn’t end up much cheaper in the long run

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    1. Vicktor "Vic" Alexander
      Vicktor "Vic" Alexander at |

      I don’t think I write short books either. I’ve had a few stories in anthologies, but other than that most of my books are at least 20k? And even those are few and far in between. I’m a novelist, both as a reader and as an author. I read novellas also, but I don’t seek them out. There are some authors who can do a lot with 25-40k words, but I totally agree that having a story unfold slowly is oftentimes so much better. I’m a big series person too, especially as an author, so I feel you there. LOL.

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  3. ssconnors
    ssconnors at |

    I am the same as the reply above. I don’t read short books. To me it doesn’t give enough time to develop the characters. I like there to be at least 40K, which isn’t real long but enough to create a good story. With saying that, it depends on how good the reviews are to how much I will spend on the book. I have spent $10 on some really bad book and I have gotten some really good books for free. I don’t think price dictates quality. I review the books I read because then I get the recommendations and I am more likely to buy a book off of the recommendations. I enjoyed your article and can see your point.

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    1. Vicktor "Vic" Alexander
      Vicktor "Vic" Alexander at |

      Thank you. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I was very big on only buying novels unless the book was by one of my auto-buys, but I got on this major “Only-Want-To-Read-Mpreg” kick and a lot of those are 15-30k words. Some even shorter. It’s harder to read a 40k book with a mpreg spin when most of them are written by me, or I’ve already read it, or they’re so far in between that I’d be waiting for months/a year, before I read another one. I’m trying to think if I’ve ever spent over $10 on a book I thought was bad… or even one I thought was good. In paperback/hardcover I know I have, but in ebook… I can’t think of one. Kudos to you!

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  4. bastdazbog
    bastdazbog at |

    As an avid reader, I agree with so much of your post. I remember the first time I had settled down for what I thought would be a 2 to 2 1/2 hour read, but then the HEA came after I’d only been reading an hour. I was like WTF? Did I skip a bunch of chapters? I didn’t think so, there weren’t any weird jumps in the story or anything. I went back to my main books page and I noticed it said I was only 47% of the way through the book. Normally I try to ignore that % counter – I feel like it’s looking over my shoulder judging me. Also, seeing the counter takes me out of the story, making me conscious of the time I am spending reading, allowing other thoughts to intrude. (And it never shows 100% even when I read to the very last page. Annoying.)
    I went back into the book, and paged past the authors page at the end of the story, and there were 20 page excerpts from maybe 10 books. I felt like I’d gotten the Reader’s Digest condensed version of the story that I’d actually purchased, just so that there’d be room for more ads at the end. I was mad, and frustrated and chalked it up to that particular publisher and decided I’d be more wary of buying books from that publisher, but it’s not just one publisher that does that. Now that is actually what I expect to get, and when it isn’t it’s a wonderfully pleasant surprise. But it doesn’t stop me reading, or buying. 🙂

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    1. Vicktor "Vic" Alexander
      Vicktor "Vic" Alexander at |

      Oh man! That has happened to me sooooo many times! One of the last books I read, was identified as being 70k words so I was excited. It was priced at $4.99 and I felt like for the word count it was justified, and it was a new-to-me author that I’d recently come to really like. After maybe 25k words, the story that I’d bought the book from was over. Like you I checked, and Siri sort of caught an attitude when she told me what percentage and what position I was at in the book repeatedly. When I moved past that last page I came upon another short story, then ads, then the excerpt for a “full-length novel.” The crazy thing is? That book had been marketed the same way. It was quite frustrating. I did find out later that it was one of the author’s earlier works and that they didn’t do that (as much) any more, but that one incident sort of set a coal on this fire of a topic in my brain.
      And yes, publishers do like to market and advertise for other authors at the end of the book, but usually only if they have only published one book with them, or maybe two. It boosts the author’s sales, but also, if they put the blurbs, excerpts, covers of other authors it helps their sales, helps readers get introduced to new authors they may not have known about before, and it helps the publisher generate more revenue. My issue is when a book is marketed as a 40k word novel, and 20k of that is adverts, blurbs, promo for other works, and I’m still being charged as if it actually was a 70k word novel.
      I think I was more annoyed for the/my readers because as I was running into these incidents I kept saying: “Why are they doing this to the readers?” “Oh my poor readers.” “That is a shame.” LOL.

      Reply
  5. Roberta
    Roberta at |

    Hey Vic!! Glad to hear from you. As a reader, I’m so conscience of page/word count of the stories I read. Like you, I’m freakin SHOCKED when someone wants a book for 85-120 pages for 4 dollars or more. These are just tiny summaries of a story to me. I feel like a nice long book over 200 pages, really allows me as a reader to get into the story. To feel for the characters, to KNOW the characters.
    That being said…some books that are long…damn…they just don’t make sense sometimes. It’s hard to find something to either like or vaguely relate to the characters.
    I’ve tried KU and I have to say, that the genre that I’m having a weird love affair with, m-preg…those stories are always short stories and then…the rest of the book are blurbs for other stories or another story entirely. I really hate that. I want one story…not multiple short, 30 mins reads. I want a story that draws me in and takes me on a hell of a ride. I don’t care if it’s fluffy or whatnot…I just want a good book to take me away.

    Reply
    1. Vicktor "Vic" Alexander
      Vicktor "Vic" Alexander at |

      Hey Roberta! I agree. I KNOW what you mean about the mpreg stories that are multiple shorts put together in one book. I think that’s why my books always seem to be so long, so that I can help the readers know and love (or hate) my characters as much as I do. I want the readers to feel like my characters are having dinner with them or taking them on the journey with them, I’m not able to do that in a book less than 30/40k at the very, very least. Thanks for the comment!

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